Mental health inpatients could soon be wearing these futuristic glasses to improve their sleep patterns and reduce their need for sedative medications.

Pitching in for better sleep on the ward

November 2017

Mental health inpatients could soon be wearing these futuristic glasses to improve their sleep patterns and reduce their need for sedative medications.

Mental health inpatients could soon be wearing these futuristic glasses to improve their sleep patterns and reduce their need for sedative medications.

Developed by researchers at Adelaide's Flinders University, the Re-Timer glasses shine glowing green-blue light into the eye of the wearer to help manipulate their production of melatonin — the hormone the body uses to induce sleep. ”

The biggest driver of your body clock is light and the light on the ward, even a brightly lit ward, is one-hundredth the intensity of outside on a cloudy day,” RPA’s Professor Nick Glozier said.

“We are not augmenting the body clock of our patients, enabling them to get good circadian rhythms.”

The glasses were worn by several Socceroos to combat jet lag on their flight home from Honduras during the World Cup qualifications.

Professor Glozier, a Clinical Academic at the Professor Marie Bashir Centre and the University of Sydney, was awarded $46,500 at the latest round of The Pitch on Friday to roll out the program over 12 months.

Judges Chief Executive Dr Teresa Anderson, Associate Professor Vicki Taylor, Associate Professor Victor Storm and RPA’s acting general manager Nobby Alcala also funded the purchase of Saebo orthosis treatment kits for use at Balmain and Royal Prince Alfred hospitals at a cost of $41,187.

Occupational therapist Catherine Wickson said the orthosis kits were used to improve hand and arm mobility and function in people with neurological injuries, including stroke.

“The Saebo will allow these clients with limited hand movements post stroke to be able to complete high intensity repetitions and task-specific training,” she said.

The panel also funded a children’s play area at the antenatal clinic at Canterbury Hospital. A grant of $28,900 will go towards an interactive digital wall, a wall mural, bookshelf and wall mounted toy panel to entertain children who accompany their mothers to appointments.

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